Finding the Angel by Rubina Ramesh

51Q9SX5U-XL.jpgFinding the Angel is Rubina Ramesh’s second book, the first being Knitted Tales, an anthology.

The Blurb:

All She wanted was love…
Shefali is a die-hard romantic. Having lost her parents at a very tender age, she is in search of a place which she can call home. Her passion for Art lands her a job as an art curator to the famous artifacts of the Ranaut Dynasty. When she meets the scion, Aryan Ranaut, she feels that her dream might come true until…
All He wanted was to trust…
Living the life of a modern day Prince is no easy task for the young and dashing Aryan Ranaut. Having lost his father to a rapacious woman, Aryan has severe trust issues. But upon meeting Shefali, he feels he could let down his guard. Until…
All They need is to find The Angel…
Just as Aryan realizes his love for Shefali, one of the most precious artifacts, The Angel, goes missing from the Ranaut collection. All fingers point towards Shefali—more so because she leaves the palace without telling anyone on the very night of the theft.
Finding the Angel is a story where duty clashes with love and lack of trust overrides passion. Under these circumstances, can The Angel bring the star-crossed lovers together?

The story:

Shefali Verma, 26, lost her parents in a car accident at the age of twelve. Kalpana Desai, her guardian, boss and mentor and her mother’s best friend had taken her under her wing. Now, Shefali is given the job of cataloging the antiques belonging to the Ranaut Estate by Kalpana and she grabs the job as it is a challenge to the historian in her and also because the project is very important for her company. A friendly person living on her own, Shefali has no problem in mixing with new people and follows quite a few dramas on TV as the daily soaps kept her loneliness at bay. Novelty of living in a palace excites Shefali. For the project, Shefali has to work with Prince Aryan Ranaut, Scion of the Ranaut Family, and Kalpana warns her against his amorous adventures.

Aryan is the sole in-charge of the art collection, having fallen in love with the art collection when his grandfather had introduced him to it. A shrewd and astute businessman, Aryan took over the family business after completing his education from Harvard University and has been labelled as the youngest entrepreneur. Every cell of his body spoke of Royal blood and he has political influences in all the right places. Sonakshi and Raima are his married sisters who stay in the estate with their husbands.

As a part of the project, she is entrusted with a very rare Fabrege, one of the rarest of its kind, The Angel with Egg in a Chariot, which is stolen and they think that she has stolen The Angel. She leaves the palace at the first instance without finishing the project because of forced circumstances and he has her under surveillance. He loves his mother, Gitanjali Devi, the queen, and was holding Shefali responsible for her unhappiness. He technically kidnaps her and takes her back to Ranaut and is willing to let her go free, without pressing any charges, if she hands over The Angel to him.

Both need to find it for different reasons- she, to salvage her reputation and he, for his mother, so they join forces. He is not a normal, easy going guy and she is a simple girl from Nagpur. He was after her because he thought she had stolen his precious Fabrege Egg, The Angel. She was the only woman who kindled a passionate fire within him, he had respect for her but he knew she was the one for him but had promised himself that no woman would ever make him weak. Like a fool, she had fallen in love with him.

My take:

The story is simple and has been written very well. The characters have been developed well and are very realistic. The language is simple and the flow is excellent. The conversations between the characters have been very beautifully written and the emotions of both the characters have been described well.

The mystery makes the romance even more interesting. Loved the book immensely, a perfect read for the vacations.

Looking forward to more romances from you, Rubina.

 

 

 

 

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Seventeen takes by Naima Kalra Gupta

61Y2PwbPnAL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgI received Seventeen Takes by Naima Kalra Gupta as a review copy from Rupa Publications and I would like to thank the publisher for providing me with a copy of the book. The book has been divided into two parts and has seventeen ?stories.

The blurb:

Seventeen Takes is a mix of fiction and non-fiction pieces about everything a teenager experiences, ranging from growing up, formulating a self-identity and realizing (or not) who you are. Written by a seventeen-year-old, this is a coming-of-age book but not in a traditional sense. It’s not about heartbreak or enduring friendships or alcohol and partying. It’s about the self, the war that wages within all of us. Figuring out what to do with one’s life, lamenting the loss of innocent childhood, coming to terms with changing beliefs and ideals, developing new ideas are themes that feature prominently in this collection. Simple yet poignant, fiercely individualistic yet easily relatable, Seventeen Takes is a book that will resonate with everyone on the cusp of adulthood.

My take:

As the author has mentioned in the introduction, this compilation is a collection of stories and memoirs. A very self centred book, it is about the war that wages within all of us. She has used characters to talk about some aspects of her own journey. Each story contains some element of truth replicating in some ways, her own life. The stories are about a seventeen year old girl who does what she wants to do and has the rest of her life to look forward to.

This book is a mix of fiction and non-fiction and relates to a teenager’s experience. She has also written about Delhi and what it means to her. The second part revolves around social issues.

The author has used simple language to express her opinions and feelings.

Disclaimer: I received a free copy of the book from the publisher in return for my honest review. I have NOT received any monetary compensation for the same.

Twin Torment by Sundari Venkatraman

BlogTT.jpgTwin Torment, a novella by Sundari Venkatraman, is the second edition, the original book which was originally published as Double Jeopardy and has been scrapped. , . It is the story of Sanya, Arth and Ansh.

The blurb:

London based Sanya Chaturvedi is bored of the party circuit. The only child of a rich businessman, Sanya hates her aimless life and grabs the chance to revisit Mumbai, where she had spent the first twelve years of her life.
The main attraction is her childhood sweetheart Arth Sharma. She hopes to rekindle the love she used to feel for him as a kid.
Sanya’s thrilled with the opportunity to holiday with the Sharmas. But it’s Arth’s tormenting twin Ansh who insists on spending time with her while the man of her dreams is never around. And the worst part is that her body plays traitor, lusting after the devilishly handsome Ansh.
Will Sanya find relief from her bored life? And the love she came in search of? Read the book to find how destiny plays a strong role as Sanya deals with the Twin Torment in her life.

The story:

Sanya Chaturvedi, the only child of Diwakar and Bindiya, has been in love with Arth Sharma ever since she was eleven and he, sixteen.  And it never struck to find out if he returned her feelings. He had hung out a lot with her and treated her like a China doll, the only problem being, Ansh, his twin, who used to trouble her all the time. The Chaturvedis moved lock, stock and barrel to London when she was thirteen. She missed him a lot.

Now, Sanya is 22, and is plain bored with her monotonous life. She has a BA degree and does not know what to do with her life. If her mother had her way, she would have been married to the first eligible Indian bachelor, but Sanya wants to be independent, she wants a purpose in life. And her father suggests that she go to Mumbai for a holiday. For her, it would be a break before she decided what she wanted to do and also she could get to know Arth better.

Arth and Ansh are the twin sons of Shantanu and Ratna Sharma. They look alike but have opposite personalities; Arth, her savior and Ansh, the bane of her life. She does not like Ansh at all and Arth would protect her from Ansh in their childhood days.

Now, nine years later, Sanya comes back to Mumbai to stay with the Sharmas and hopes that Arth would pick her up at the airport but it is Ansh, who is there to receive her. She hates him since childhood and she makes her disappointment, on seeing him at the airport, obvious. She sees more and more of Ansh and Arth is always missing.

She finds her true vocation and plans to make cooking her career but is confused between her heart and head.

The review:

I love books which are romantic and have happy endings. And to say that this book was a nice, short and sweet read, would not be the right description of the book. It was toooooooo good. The story is simple and the characters, especially Sanya, are relatable. The language is simple and the flow, good. The author has beautifully portrayed human relationships.  The plot was interesting; very different from what I expected. The author has described the feelings of the characters.

I loved it when Ansh calls his mother, “Jewel of my life’, I wish all mother-child relationships are like this.

 

Author Interview: Anuradha Prasad

img-20161202-wa0023Dr Anuradha Prasad is a post graduate in English literature and Phd (English) from Mumbai University and has been writing since she can remember. She is a feature writer, worked and published with Times of India, Free Press house, Body and Beauty Care, Incredible India, Woman’s Era and other notable publications. She has worked as a senior editor for lifestyle magazines, developed and edited web content, as a natural progression towards her journey into writing. Times West Side Plus had featured her for their second anniversary issue. She has, to her credit, hundreds of published and edited work. She teaches journalism on invitation to youngsters that she enjoys immensely. ‘Two Winters and 365 Days’ is her first book as a writer. She has just launched her second book, ‘Coming back Home’. I am very thankful to her for giving me this opportunity to interview her.

Thank you, Dr Anuradha for the interview. At the outset, could you please tell the readers about yourself?

You have already given such an introduction that I am at a loss of words. Further on the topic- I also love traveling, observing nature, gardening, cooking exotic foods and spending time at home in front of the idiot box. Very few people know that I aspired to be a model in my college days and even featured in some brand modeling. Destiny had other plans. As I matured, I became more intellectually inclined. I started looking at more permanent options for a career, as I realized that a model’s shelf life was very short. Focus on learning, wisdom and intellect took centre stage. I swear by constant learning that promotes change and growth. I lead a simple life, taking care of my family, spending time with friends and loved ones. I strongly believe that things happen for a cause.

You are a post graduate in English literature and Phd (English). Did this in some way help in your writing?

It was actually the other way round. Because I was good at English language, I took to studying English literature and yes, I must say that after completing my PhD in English I realized that I had not given wings to the writer in me and determined to do so.

You have written hundreds of articles. What motivated you to write a full-fledged novel?

I wanted my work to outlive me. A book is eternal. It is a legacy you pass on to your kids and the generations next. So I decided to write one. Another reason why I wrote a novel was I had never written a single short or a long story in my entire career as a feature writer so it presented a greater challenge for me and I love challenges!   It also hit me that there was nothing new in the field of feature writing that I could explore, as I had experimented with all the genres.

Lastly, often I had heard from friends and colleagues as to how difficult it was for a writer to get recognition.  So I guess I wanted to experience all the pitfalls and exhilaration myself.

What were the challenges faced while writing the books?

Surprisingly my second book flowed. Believe it or not, I have not so far edited a single situation or a page, unlike the first that had many.

The first biggest task was thinking of a realistic story line with realistic situations, creating characters and writing dialogues, researching for global audiences, so on and so forth, I have aspired that the readers should take away something from my fist book without it being very heavy on the psyche or sounding preachy. Coming to the point, the first book was challenging (as it was first) and also I had no clue about how to put so many pages together. As for the second one, I had visualized the concept and I decided to make my story unique and it came up to my expectations. I wish readers would love it and take away something from it as well.

Are your books based on someone you know or heard of?

No. Not at all!

The covers of both your books are very nice, did you have a say in designing it?

Yes absolutely. I had a say and the designer worked on the inputs given by me. For my second book I got an awesome person who worked on every concept detail I provided with and came up with the amazingly stunning cover. I love it!

Who is your favorite author?

My all-time fav author is Danielle Steel and I can also add Sydney Sheldon, Jeffery Archer, Harold Robins, Barbara Cartland, Ernest Hemingway, Shakespeare, Wordsworth, Milton, Mahatma Gandhi, Arundhati Roy, Khushwant Singh, Robin Sharma, Chetan Bhagat, Rhonda Byrne and J.K Rowling.

I don’t stick to a particular author now. Sometimes, I pick a book on my own or the one suggested by my friends.

Which book are you currently reading?

Right now I am not reading any book.

What is the next project that you are working on? When is the next book scheduled for release?

I have not yet started to work on the next book. I might after sometime.

What will be your advice to the upcoming novelists and writers?

It’s easier saying than doing but rejections are a part of life. Take it with a pinch of salt and move on. Keep an alternative career on the side.  Write to express and feel happy rather than to become famous or to make money. More you will run after name and fame less you shall get it. Don’t push yourself. If your work is good or if you are destined to, you shall surely get recognition. Write honestly from your heart! Chill, Chill, Chill at all times. Do not expect your home fires to burn with your writing talent. Believe that there is a place for everyone in this universe and every dog has its day. Your day shall come very soon. Move with this faith and strength. All the best!

Her website is www.anuradha-prasad.com.

 Anuradha’s books are available: On all the online stores as well as off it. You can grab your copy maybe from a store nearby.

 

KNITTED TALES: A Collection of Emotions by Rubina Ramesh

32446826.jpgI love reading short stores and find it difficult to review them because I feel I would be giving it all away. Knitted Tales: A Collection of Emotions by Rubina Ramesh is a collection of twelve short stories.

The blurb (from Goodreads):

What forces an innocent girl to become a sex symbol? Her desires? Or cruel fate?
Is a lifetime enough—for avenging a betrayal? How do you hide secrets that never stopped haunting you?

Can vengeance and secrets of your past devastate your present? How can long-buried crimes of yours suddenly raise their head? Can sinning be saving?
Is your spouse your soulmate? What if they never understood your feelings? Can you still live with them?

Lastly, does life give only two options? Live or die? What if there is a third?
In her anthology, Knitted Tales: A collection of emotions, Rubina Ramesh tries to find answers to these questions that are often from the heart and yet make the mind ponder over the solution. Or is it the other way round? Either way, Knitted Tales is a bouquet of emotions that is bound to touch both your head and your heart.

The stories:

The first story, A secret in the closet, is about how the nightmare of a ten year old girl brings out skeletons hidden in her parents’ closet. The second story, Betrayal, was eerie.  The third story, Chiclets, is about an Indian immigrant girl and her teething problems in US- being called a Chiclet. Forgive me, for I have sinned was one story with an unexpected ending. Lolita is about an actress and how she became one. No regrets is the story of an immigrant housewife and how she manages to get what she wants.

The seventh story is about inseparable lovers, Suvarna and Rekha and Missing staircase is about the relationship between a granddaughter and her grandfather. The tenth story, the other woman is about how both the women suffer at the hands of a man. Daddy, Hear me out is one story every parent should read and realize that there is more to life than what we want for our kids. The last story, Cliff Notes, gives a nice end to the book.

But all in all, my favourite story was, The Little Godmother, a practical story, an experience every parent sees the first born going through when the next baby arrives. It is one story that I would request all the parenting books to have, because, it will help the parents a long way.

My take:

The cover is different. It took me a few minutes to realize what is being depicted, and once I saw the face, it was what I saw when I saw the cover next. All the stories have different settings and have been written very well. The words have been chosen with care- not too many and neither too less, making the length of the stories just apt. The flow and pace of the stories makes the book a page turner. The characters are from different walks of life and are very realistic. The scenes have been beautifully described and can be visualized easily.

The stories revolve around many emotions like suspense, love, passion, anger, parental love, sibling rivalry, secrecy and many more. Some stories had hidden messages and some made me think, is it so??? When I finished reading the first story, I felt that if all of them are so heavy, it would take me a lot of time to finish the book, but I was wrong and I am glad.

A must read for everyone.

SHADOWED PROMISE From riots in Bombay to the riches of Beverly hills… by Sunanda Chatterjee

51i6qFeKgTL._AC_US160_.jpgShadowed Promise by Sunanda Chatterjee is the second book by the author that I have read.The book is about the life of a girl, Moyna Sengupta, considered a bad omen by her family, a noshter goda or the root of destruction. She is a strong, determined woman, out to carve a niche for herself.

The Blurb:

Moyna’s cousin panted at the doorway, heavy with child. “Who did this to you?” her father shouted. And Moyna knew that somehow she would be blamed for this unspeakable shame on the family. Her aunt blamed her for all the tragedies, from the death of Moyna’s own parents to the riots in Bombay. But, as her cousin lay dying of stab wounds, Moyna promised to protect the baby.
In a panic, eighteen-year-old Moyna made a hasty decision that would return to haunt her years later.
Bullied as a child, Sameer wants to make the world a safer place.  He has spurned a cushy career in his father’s law firm for public service. Sameer is drawn to the mysterious Moyna when they meet in Los Angeles. The attraction seems mutual, but Moyna remains cautious and secretive about her past, insulating herself from love to protect others from her unlucky curse.
At the cusp of political victory, Sameer faces increasing gun violence and death threats leading to an FBI investigation. But his greatest challenge comes when a shadow from Moyna’s past threatens to destroy their future.
What hope do they have with the media hungering for a scandal?
A story of friendship, redemption, and forgiveness, “Shadowed Promise” is a journey from blind faith to triumphant love.

The story:

Seven year old Moyna Sengupta’s uncle brings her to Bombay after she loses her parents in an accident. Her aunt considers her to be a bad omen, but her ten year old cousin, Tania tells her there is no such thing as bad omen. Her aunt blames her for everything that happens in and around them, even accidents. Ever since her arrival in Bombay, the girls are introduced to outsiders as sisters, as they looked very much alike.

Now eleven years later, December 1992, Moyna, 18 is studying for her SAT exams and Tania is studying in Delhi. Tania is happy with the life her aunt led and Moyna wants a real career. Moyna wants to get to a quiet, clean and open place where she could pursue her studies in peace, judged on her own merit and not compared with her fairer, prettier cousin. She wants to be independent and have a family of her own.

The riots after the Babri Masjid issue are gaining momentum and the family is waiting for Tania who is coming from Delhi, a visibly pregnant Tania arrives, much to the shock of the family. Moyna wants to know more about Tania’s condition, but Tania tells her to pursue her dreams and make her proud and that they would talk about it later. She appears for her SAT exams, excels in them and gets accepted to USC with full scholarship and moves to the U.S. But at a price. On the day of the exam, she loses her friend, Karan Singh and her cousin to the mob and takes the responsibility of Avinash, Tania’s son, by putting her name along with Karan’s on his birth certificate. Her aunt tells her to leave India and not think about Avi, not talk about him, and take her shadow away from Avi, so that Avi could be protected as she had promised Tania. Tania’s suitcase, the one she had put under the bed when Tania had come home from Delhi, which was never opened, guides her.

In August 1993, she meets Lupe and Aaron on the first day at the University and they become best friends. Sameer Singhania, who is half Indian and the son of a rich lawyer also is in their batch. His father wants him to become a lawyer but Sameer dreams of joining public office to make a difference in the lives of all Californians. Sameer is instantly attracted to her and she reminds him of a girl his best friend Jeff was smitten by while on vacation in India. She is also attracted to him but wants to protect him from the curse. She graduates earlier and joins law school, and keeps her uncle and aunt updated through letters, which always go unanswered. She gets married to Sameer, after a lot of persuasion from him and joins his father’s law firm. But her secret still lies buried deep inside her.

What happens next? Does Avi see his birth certificate? Does her aunt forgive her? Does Sameer come to know of her past? Can she keep the promise she made to Tania? Most important, does she come out of the curse? Read on……

My take:

A beautifully written story, with great characters written in a simple language. The characters are well developed and realistic. There are not many characters in the story and the author has justified the presence of each of them. The descriptions are detailed, be it of the characters or of the scenes, I could actually visualize the scenes. The conversations between the characters were so realistic, I felt that they were conversing right in front of me and I was actually not reading the dialogues. The author has taken pains to explain meanings of Indian terms and even relatives’ for the non-Indian reader, or even for the non-Bengali reader.

The story is fast paced, with not a dull moment in between, and moves from one chapter to another flawlessly, in a chronological manner, with the month and the year mentioned at the beginning of the chapter.

The author has put in a lot of emotions in the book. She made me laugh, cry and smile. One twist towards the end, changed everything for me.

Highly recommended, with a small word of caution: The story will stay with you long after you finish the book.

Disclaimer: I received a free e-copy of the book from the author in return for my honest review. I have NOT received any monetary compensation for the same.

Thank you so much for the book, Sunanda.

Spotlight: SHADOWED PROMISE From riots in Bombay to the riches of Beverly hills… by Sunanda Chatterjee

 

SHADOWED PROMISE

From riots in Bombay to the riches of Beverly hills…

by
Sunanda Chatterjee
 
Blurb
 
Moyna’s cousin panted at the doorway, heavy with child. “Who did this to you?” her father shouted. And Moyna knew that somehow she would be blamed for this unspeakable shame on the family. Her aunt blamed her for all the tragedies, from the death of Moyna’s own parents to the riots in Bombay. But, as her cousin lay dying of stab wounds, Moyna promised to protect the baby.
 
In a panic, eighteen-year-old Moyna made a hasty decision that would return to haunt her years later. 
 
Bullied as a child, Sameer wants to make the world a safer place.  He has spurned a cushy career in his father’s law firm for public service. Sameer is drawn to the mysterious Moyna when they meet in Los Angeles. The attraction seems mutual, but Moyna remains cautious and secretive about her past, insulating herself from love to protect others from her unlucky curse.
 
At the cusp of political victory, Sameer faces increasing gun violence and death threats leading to an FBI investigation. But his greatest challenge comes when a shadow from Moyna’s past threatens to destroy their future.
 
What hope do they have with the media hungering for a scandal?
 
A story of friendship, redemption, and forgiveness, “Shadowed Promise” is a journey from blind faith to triumphant love.

 

Read an excerpt of #SP here:
Sameer chased after Moyna as she opened the side-door to the stairwell. When the door nearly swung shut, he stuck in his foot and opened it again. She had already reached the landing, so he took the stairs two at a time. “Moyna, I wanted to say congratulations!”
Her face glowed in the cardinal and gold graduation gown. A low pony swung below the cap, the tassels of which hung at her cheek. She looked happy. She smiled at him, for a moment, without holding back. Her smile was dazzling in its brilliance. Why didn’t she smile more?
She said, “Was that all you wanted?”
He grinned. You have no idea what I want! “I was thinking… now that you’ve graduated, maybe we can take this to the next level.”
She stared at him. “Sameer, I have a lot of baggage. There are things about my past… I can never tell you.”
“I don’t care about the past. I want to know if there’s any hope of a future for us.”
She sighed, a sorrowful, regretful sigh that turned his heart cold, as if she had slapped him on his face. She would never let him into her heart. But she said, “You’ll never be satisfied with what I can offer.”
You’ve offered me nothing before! He put his arm around her waist and pulled her close. “As long as you’re giving me all you can offer. Moyna, you have no idea what you make me feel. Just be with me. With time, you’ll trust me enough to let me into that wonderful heart of yours.”
She stared with those hypnotic eyes. Her lip trembled a little. And he had no doubt she felt the same way. He drew her closer, held her face, and pressed his lips to hers, as her cap fell to the floor.
Her lips felt petal soft against his, her arms on his back felt like chains from which he never wanted freedom. His hands roved over her neck and back and came to rest on her hips. The smell of her perfume, her breath, the feel of her skin against his, intoxicated him.
Above and below them, footsteps of students echoed in the stairwell. He hungered for breath, but couldn’t let go. She seemed to melt in his arms as she clung to him, teasing his hair, and raking his back.
When she pulled away, he wondered what year it was.
She was panting.
He watched his reflection dance in her eyes and it felt so right. That’s all he wanted. Her image in his eyes, and his in hers. Nothing else mattered. “I … I think I’m in love with you.”
He felt her stiffen as she took a step back. Did I say something wrong? Her expression was inexplicable. Her lips trembled, her eyes moistened, and it seemed that every fiber of her body wanted to be with him.
And yet he heard her saying, “I can’t do this!” She turned away and darted down the corridor toward her room.
He chased after her and grabbed her wrist. “I don’t understand. Is there someone else?”
She whirled around to face him, eyes wild with panic. “What? Yes. Yes, there’s someone else!”
She tried to wrench her hand free, but he tightened his grip. “Who? Karan? How come I’ve never met him?”
She stopped struggling. “You’ll never understand. Please, Sameer, I can’t be with you. Walk away from me. For your own good. It’s best for both of us.”
“I don’t believe it.” He jabbed his finger at the stairwell. “Just a minute ago you were kissing me. Tell me it meant nothing to you!”
“Stop!”
He saw a sparkle of tears in her eyes and his face softened. “Moyna, look into my eyes and tell me you don’t love me.”
She didn’t say anything. He wrapped her into a powerful embrace and kissed her, tasting the tears on her cheeks. He shivered as her hands snaked below his arms and ran up his back, hooking around his shoulders; she clung to him, and their bodies molded into each other.
He felt the warmth of her breath, her skin, and her flesh, and knew he never wanted to be with anyone else. After a moment’s hesitation, she kissed him back, sending his head spinning.
He lifted her off her feet with ease and pinned her against the wall. She wrapped her arms around his neck and nipped at his lips, as his hand found her breast. Control was out of the question. The fire of that raw desire burnt any logic he had left. He wanted her as much as she wanted him.
And then she struggled out of his embrace. A sharp pain pierced through his numbed consciousness when she stamped on his shoe with her three inch heel. He winced and hopped on one foot.
Panting, she glared at him and scrubbed her mouth. Then she pushed against him with both her hands, her eyes brimming with angry tears. “You arrogant, presumptuous, selfish bastard! Just because you’ve never been refused anything in your life, you think you can go about taking what’s not yours.”
Confused, he frowned and took a step toward her as she backed into the wall. “But you’re mine, Moyna!”
She gave a scornful laugh. “Your wealth means nothing to me. Your beauty means nothing to me. You’ll never be like Karan. Karan was brave, noble and selfless. You’re nothing!”
Sameer stepped back, his mind in turmoil. She hates me. Her dalliance with him had been a farce. The last three years had been a lie. He rubbed his forehead, stunned. “Wh…”
She yelled in a shaking voice, “Do you hear me? You mean nothing to me! Leave me alone.”

 

He clenched his fists, turned on his heel, and walked away, his steps booming in the quiet corridor, as his future with her vanished into oblivion.

 

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About the author

 

 

 

 


Freelance author, blogger, and ex-Indian Air Force physician Sunanda Joshi Chatterjee completed her graduate studies in Los Angeles, where she is a practicing pathologist. While medicine is her profession, writing is her passion. When she’s not at the microscope making diagnoses, she loves to write fiction. Her life experiences have taught her that no matter how different people are, their desires, fears, and challenges remain the same.

 

 

 

Her themes include romantic sagas, family dramas, immigrant experience, women’s issues, medicine, and spirituality. She loves extraordinary love stories and heartwarming tales of duty and passion. Her short stories have appeared in short-story.net and induswomanwriting.com. 

 

She grew up in Bhilai, India, and lives in Arcadia, California with her husband and two wonderful children. In her free time, she paints, reads, sings, goes on long walks, and binge-watches TV crime dramas.

 

 

 

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