Angelic Beats by Sarita Singh

21vCGI6cCBLI received Angelic Beats by Sarita Singh as a review copy from the Book Club and would like to thank Rubina for the same. Angelic Beats is the story of a nineteen year old boy, Sahil, falling in love with a lady who is five years older than him and married one at that.  Sahil meets Aakansha at a friend’s house and falls in love with her. Slowly, she starts to reciprocate his feelings and their love grows. But, she is married.

My take:

I loved the way the author has written the story in first person describing Sahil’s feelings. That she has put in a lot of research in the book, shows in the way she has described Sahil’s time at the academy. Though, the story revolves around an extra marital affair, the author has shown a different aspect.

Warning: Please, I repeat, please, do not read the prologue of the book, it will spoil the climax.

Book Source: Review copy from the book club

Publisher: Leadstart Publishing

Advertisements

In a feeling named love by D Saathwik

unnamed (1)I received, In a feeling named love by D Saathwik, as a review copy from the publishers BecomeShakespeare.

This book starts in 2020 when Ritwik’s friends invite him for dinner and are surprised to see that he is not accompanied by his wife. And then the book moves into flashback to 2005 when Ritwik is in school. Being brought up by a protective mother, who would pick and drop him to school everyday, Ritwik chances to meet Shrita, who is there to meet her cousin. He is attracted to her and strikes a friendship with her and this friendship blossoms into love and both the families accept the relationship till………………

My take:

The book has been written in first person from Ritwiks point of view. The characters have been developed well and I felt that there is little bit of Ritwik in someone we meet everyday. He has portrayed the love between the two protagonists as something very sacred. The language is simple and the dates mentioned help maintain the chronology of events.

Book Source: Review copy from Publisher

Publisher: BecomeShakespeare.com

Canvas of dreams by Jaya Siva Murty

unnamed

Canvas of Dreams by Jaya Siva Murty  is the story of Riya and her life.

Book Blurb

canvas-of-dreamsRiya seems to have lost everything—the man she loves to another woman, her husband to death and her soul to fear.

When she finally realizes her dream of opening an art gallery, however, things begin to look up. On the one hand, she is working closely with the handsome artist, Rehaan. On the other, her first love Ryan comes back into her life, and the other woman is out of the picture.

But can she move on from her past, or will its long fingers cast a shadow on everything she does?

The story:

Ten years ago, Riya and Ryan studied in the same class since kindergarten in Kanpur and Ryan would help Riya in Maths. They were family friends and would meet off and on. Slowly, the friendship developed into love and Ryan moved to Philippines in the eleventh standard but they would find time to meet when he would be back on vacations. They move to college, she, to study fine arts at Baroda’s MS University and he, to University of Phillipines. And, thus started their long distance relationship, until she hears about Sia.

Now, Riya is 32, a widow for 5 years, working in an Art Gallery. She goes to Singapore to attend the ‘South Asian Curators Summit’ and runs into Ryan, He is still the same and as affectionate as before and a confused Riya comes back to Mumbai. With the help of her best friend, Shweta, she overcomes her nightmare and moves back into her marital home. She decides to convert it into an art gallery and meets Rehaan, an artist, who falls in love with her. And then Ryan comes back to Mumbai.

My take:

The story has been written very well and the characters are very real. The English is simple and the flow is good. The supporting characters also have an important role to play. I liked the way the author has moved from first person to third person without affecting the flow of the story. The book is actually a beautiful story painted in words. An excellent work for a debutant author.

Book Source: Indireads/ The Book Club Group

Publisher: Indireads

 

Bong Mom’s Cookbook by Sandeepa Mukherjee Datta

Bong Mom's Cookbook by Sandeepa Mukherjee Datta

I was born in Bengal, so I feel a whole lot of me is Bengali. People often ask my husband, “Is your wife a Bengali?” He says, “She is not, but her soul is”. Living in Delhi for 12 years now, I miss the traditional Bengali food. Married in a Punjabi home, the smell of fish is a no-no. Though when we cook fish, it is with the chimney, the exhaust on and all the bedroom doors closed, followed by lighting candles to ward of the remnant smell. When I go mishti shopping in Delhi, the ones I want are not available, but Annapurna in Chandni Chowk is where my mishti shopping starts and ends.

The other day, I wanted to make Aloor dom in Bengali style and as I googled the word, Bong Mom’s Cookbook popped out on screen.

There were recipes and recipes. The most positive thing that I found on the blog was where she wrote that she is coming up with the cookbook next. I was browsing through flipkart and it was there that I saw the book on sale. I ordered it and very promptly, it was delivered to me the day after.

I was expecting a big cook book but what came was an easy to handle novel style book with stories and recipes intermingling with each other which you could read from anywhere. The front cover was simple and nice and Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni rightly mentions on the back cover, “Authentic and enjoyable, clear and personal, studded with anecdotes that warm the heart and stir up your own memories of your favourite family recipes, Bong Mom’s Cookbook is a delight to read. The only problem; you’ll have to interrupt your reading many times to try out these mouth-watering recipes!”.

This is what I did, I started the book on Thursday night at 11.55pm, read for an hour and a half and then started it off again in the morning. Two nights later, I am done with the book, I have earmarked all the recipes and flagged them. What I did was, I skipped the recipes entirely and read through her experiences because I knew if I sat down to read the recipes, I would want to make them as well. To get a taste of the Bengali cuisine, I went to Oh! Calcutta for a buffet lunch and a stomachful of Bengali food.

Her childhood, the meatsafe in her house, the kerosene stove, the Tista river, Chholar dal narikel diye, spending vacations in grandmother’s house, sumeet mixer, Bangladeshi soaps like Dallas and Different Strokes, rotating the antenna for a better reception, taking a big packet of eclairs or orange candy to school for birthdays, tomato chaatni, aam chaatni, forbidden but tempting Miils and Boon in school are reminiscent of my childhood.

Her weekday stories of getting kids ready for school, dunking marie biscuits in tea, what would I do in a spa reflects my current status.

Sandeepa Mukherjee Datta has really presented the book very well but I missed the recipe index and beautiful colourful photographs. It was quite a pleasant read.

Book Source: Bought
Publisher: Collins, An Imprint of Harper Collins Publishers

The Accidental Fiancee by Zeenat Mahal

unnamed (1)How do you feel if someone who you knew in college, whom you did not like for what he represented, is sitting in your drawing room after many years as a prospective bridegroom and yot have to smile and bear it?

Zeenat Mahal’s Accidental Fiancee is the story of Khayyam Zafar and Akbar Rasul, set in Pakistan.  I received this short story free from Indireads and would like to thank Naheed for the same.

I really loved the story, especially the way she has described the relationship between the characters. Both the characters are extremely likable and there is a Khayyam there somewhere among our acquaintances.

I really hope that Zeenat converts this short story into a novella if not a novel.

 

The book is available as a free download if you click on the link http://www.indireads.com/books/the-accidental-fiancee/ .